Luton

Lance Corporal Arthur Litchfield

L-Cpl Arthur Litchfield, 22004, Army Pay Corps, died from influenza in the No 14 General Hospital at Wimereux, France, on February 18th, 1919. He was aged 22.

Born in Luton in 1896, a son of Walter John and Sarah Litchfield, of 212 Wellington Street, Luton, he was employed by grocer Mr Kendall, of Wellington Street, and later the Co-operative Stores in Dallow Road.

He was called up in 1916 but placed on the Reserve, and he then transferred to a Co-operative Society at Coventry. He was again called up in August 1918, and was sent to Wimereux with the Army Pay Corps.

Lance Corporal James Chandler

L-Cpl James Chandler, P/10790, Military Police Corps, died on February 26th, 1919, from pneumonia in the No 17 Casualty Clearing Station in Cologne while serving with the Army of Occupation on the Rhine. He was the only former member of Luton Borough Police Force to have died while on military service during or just after World War One. He was given pride of place at the top of the Police Roll of Honour that once stood in the parade room at Luton.

Private Alfred George Cook

Pte Alfred George Cook, 200573, 1/5th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment, died on November 4th, 1918, in hospital at “Afion Farra, Kissar” (Afyonkarahisar), while a prisoner of war of the Turks.
George, as he appears to have been known, had joined the Colours on September 22nd, 1914, and left St Albans with the 1/5th Bedfords for the Gallipoli campaign, during which he was taken ill with dysentery and spent some months in hospital in Egypt.

Private Harry Wright

Pte Harry Wright, 111498, 44th Royal Fusiliers, died from pneumonia in the No 30 General Hospital at Calais on February 18th, 1919. He had returned to France from home leave on February 8th, and was admitted to hospital four days later. He had been expecting his discharge from the Army.

Private Archibald George Dimmock

Pte Archibald George Dimmock, 43069, 2nd Battalion Northants Regiment, died on February 16th, 1919, in the 55th General Hospital, Boulogne, suffering from broncho-pneumonia. He was aged 27 and had one wound stripe.

A son of Annie Dimmock, of 32 Albert Road, Luton, Archibald had attested under the Derby scheme while working on munitions at Chaul End. Early in 1916 he joined the Bedfords, with whom he went through the Battle of the Somme.

Rifleman Thomas Wilfred Hall

Rifleman Thomas Wilfred Hall, 5624, 9th King's Royal Rifles, was killed in action at Arras in France on April 9th, 1917, aged 19. He was the second of three brothers to die in the war.

At the time of the 1911 Census, Thomas plus four brothers, two sisters, father Joseph Henry and stepmother Annie were living at Stockton, Warwickshire, where Thomas was born in 1896.

Lance Corporal William George Giltrow

L-Cpl William George Giltrow, WR/266190, Railway Construction Coy Royal Engineers, died from influenza and bronchitis in the 48th Clearing Station, Namur, Belgium, on January 29, 1919. He had joined the R.E.C.Z. Headquarters in Belgium.

The 29-year-old, who lived at 23 Althop Road, Luton, was previously Assistant School Attendance Officer for Luton and a member of High Town Primitive Methodist Church, where he was choir ssecretary and a Sunday school teacher. He had also served as a special constable.

Driver Horace Coles

Driver Horace Coles, 524501, 360th Water Coy Royal Engineers, died in the 24th Stationary Hospital, Kantara, Egypt, on January 26th, 1919, from bronchial pneumonia following influenza. He had been admitted to hospital on the 18th.

Born in 1894, a son of Arthur William Coles, he had lived with his brother Sidney at 7 Wenlock Street, Luton, and enlisted in August 1915. After training at Marlow, Essex, he was drafted to Egypt in July 1917.

Prior to enlistment he was employed by dyers T. Lye & Co, New Bedford Road.

Private Bertram Wood

Pte Bertram Wood, 41662, 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, died as a prisoner of war in the Crossen Camp hospital at Kaehmen in Germany on October 22nd, 1918. The cause of death was influenza – inflammation of the lungs, as his Red Cross report stated. He was aged 29.

Company Sergeant Major Alec Cook

Company Sgt Major Alec Cook, 9119, 2nd Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment, was killed in action at Albert in France on August 20th, 1918, an action in which he was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

The medal was eventually collected by his younger sister Elsie, of 57 Frederic Street, Luton. Lieut-Col Tighe made the presentation at Biscot Camp on January 26th, 1919.

Private William Johnson

Pte William Johnson, 269206, 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 28th, 1918, during the German spring offensive. He was aged 33.

William's death appears to have gone unrecorded in local newspapers, although he is commemorated on the Luton Roll of Honour and in the Book of Life compiled at Luton Parish Church.

Sergeant Arthur Ernest Kennedy (Jamieson)

Sgt Arthur Ernest Kennedy (Jamieson), 29683, 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment (ex-20841 Devonshire Regiment), died on October 26th, 1918, while being held as a prisoner of war in Germany.

No report of his death appeared at the time, but in an earlier letter from him to Henrietta Jamieson (described as his stepmother) at 2 Edward Street, Luton, he said he was then being held in Cassel (Kassel) and he was going on all right but the chief thing he wanted was “bread and something to spread on it – a small tin of dripping would do fine”.

Sapper John William Hobbs

Sapper John William Hobbs, 522405, 486th Field Company Royal Engineers, died of pneumonia in the 87th General Hospital in Egypt on November 27th, 1918. He was aged 26 and had enlisted in January 1915.

At the time of the 1911 Census he was living with parents Alfred and Sarah and four brothers and three sisters at 339 Hitchin Road, Round Green. He was listed as a 19-year-old iron moulder.

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