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Onwards to the exhibition

The Exhibition commemorating Luton's WW1 opens on the 5th August at Wardown Park Museum.

I'm really looking forward to it...opening. The creative process is fun, believe me, but it can get a little hectic in places when you have a hundred and one things to plan and deliver by yesterday.

Prior preparation and planning prevents p*** poor performance, they told me in the forces. How true that holds! But always have unexpected curveballs showing up from time to time.

Anyway, a sneak peak at the exhibition plan for those of you who are interested :)

Diary of W.E. Owen June 1916

June 2nd Friday

Taking 26 waggons loads of Amo for the 4.5 Inch guns got back 4.30 am

June 3rd Saturday

Not out but the farm went on fire had to be up most of the night putting the fire

out saved the house and all the cattle all the out buildings badly burned

June 4th Sunday

Taking plank for dug outs left 4pm arrived back 3.30 am lost one waggon

June 12th Monday

Took the 2nd S.Stafford up to the trenches raining all the time

June 18th Sunday

Still to come, exciting

Very interesting meeting at the University of Bedfordshire today.

Got to scan in the entire war diaries of Biscot Camp, .pdf to come...But was discussing the future shape of this here site.

Improvements are coming to the way it flows i.e. how easy it is to use. Computer people use the term HCI or "Human Computer Interaction."

National Roll of the Great War

The National Roll of the Great War is one of the most sought after sets of reference books of the First World War. The National Publishing Company attempted, shortly after hostilities ceased, to compile a brief biography of as many participants in the war as possible. The vast majority of entries refer to combatants who survived the Great War or Special War Workers ( such as munitions workers) and is often the only source of information available.

First Chunk of the Luton Absent Voters List uploaded.

The Absent Voters List, is an important resource when it comes to tracing WWI ancestors. We've just uploaded the first chunk to the website, with 6 more to come.

There was a General Election in Britain in 1918. Details of men in the army were listed on Absent Voters Lists (see details below). These usually recorded the man’s regiment, number and rank at the time, as well as his home address.

4 Days in The Mall Luton

On the 28th 29th 30th and 31st March, volunteers and the WWI Project Officer, will be manning a stall at Central Square in The Mall Luton.

Come along and see us, find out a little about your town during WWI, and learn about how you can contribute your WWI stories to the project.

9AM - 5PM Fri,Sat,Mon

11AM - 4PM Sun

 

Biscot Camp

Did you know that the area bounded by Kennington Road, Biscot Road, Holland Road, and Leagrave Road; used to be the home of a large camp that trained many thousands of men to be ready for service in the Royal Field Artillery? Including the author Dennis Wheatley! It was called Biscot Camp, and was extremely important in the wartime history of the town and yet, there is very little known about it.

What happened to Grandad's medals?

Do you have your grandfather’s or another relative’s medals from the First World War?  All soldiers who served in World War One were awarded campaign medals which were automatically dispatched to their last known address or to the next of kin of deceased soldiers. You can find out more about the most common medals here.

If your ancestor served in the British Expeditionary Force at the out break of the war, they will have received the Mons Star.

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