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Peace Day trial: George Saunders

George Saunders, aged 30, Laporte dye works labourer, of 23 York Street, Luton, was charged that: “On the 19th July 1919, together with divers other persons to the number of one thousand or more unlawfully and riotously did assemble to disturb the public peace, and then did make a riot and disturbance to the terror and alarm of His Majesty’s subjects there being, and against the Peace of Our Sovereign Lord and King, his Crown and Dignity.”

Peace Day trial: Emily Tilcock

Emily Tilcock, aged 49, a straw worker,of 3 New Street, Luton, first appeared before magistrates on Wednesday, July 23rd, 1919, and was remanded in custody for a week charged with stealing three odd slippers, value 7s 6d, between 19th and 20th July, the property of James Neve Brown [J. N. Brown & Co, boot and shoe merchant, 9 Manchester Street].

Peace Day trial: Husband and wife fined

Ellen Louisa Goodridge, aged 34, a cleaner, and her husband Edgar Cecil Goodridge, aged 39, an electrician, of 63 Collingdon Street, Luton, appeared before magistrates on July 25th, 1919, jointly charged with stealing a gramophone, value £8 8s, the property of S. Farmer & Co, between 19th and 20th July. They were bailed jointly in the sum of £20 to appear again the following Wednesday.

Peace Day trial: Ellen Gilbert

Ellen Gilbert, aged 37, married, hat machinist, of 11 New Street, Luton, first appeared before magistrates on Wednesday, July 23rd, 1919, and was remanded in custody for a week charged with receiving toilet requisites valued at 4s 3d, the property of Carl Caspers [Bute Street], from Amos Gooch, who had been charged with stealing them.

Peace Day trial: Rose Winifred Bacon

Rose Winifred Bacon, aged 21, of 28 New Street, Luton, and an employee at Hubbard's dye works, first appeared before magistrates on Wednesday, July 23rd, 1919, and was remanded in custody for a week charged with larceny of scent and books, value 10s 6d, the property of Walter Clark [chemist, 83 George Street] and perfume, value 12s 6d, the property of Carl Caspers [hairdresser, 4 Bute Street].

Peace Day trial: Ada Andrews

Ada Andrews, aged 23, wife of a Portsmouth gun wharf engineer but whose mother lived at 45 Cobden Street, Luton, first appeared before magistrates on Friday, July 25th, 1919, and was remanded in custody until the following Wednesday, charged with rioting stealing toilet requisites, value 32s 6d, the property of chemist Mr Walter S. Clark.

Eleven sentenced by Luton magistrates

Riot charges heading - ST 2-8-1919

[Beds & Herts Saturday Telegraph: August 2nd, 1919]

Yesterday morning [August 1st, 1919] the Bench decided to deal with the larceny cases, and it was understood at the opening of the day's proceedings that the Justices might see their way to dealing with those charges without committing the persons concerned to the Assizes.

'The mutiny on HMS Luton'

A correspondent writing under the name 'Wireless' took a satirical look at the Peace Day riots in an article headlined 'The mutiny on HMS Luton'.

Information is to hand, he wrote in the Saturday Telegraph of August 9th, 1919, that a serious mutiny broke out on board HMS Luton on the 19th of last month. The details at present are rather meagre, but so far as can be ascertained, a section of the crew who, with others, had rendered great help to the whole of the fleet at a critical period, desired to hold a church parade on the quarter deck.

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