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Peace celebrations - good and bad

Under the heading Peace Week Brevities, the Luton News of November 14th, 1918, listed the following:

  • Several people were scorched by the heavier type of fireworks which were thrown indiscriminately among the crowds on Monday and Tuesday afternoon. Fireworks throwing and one of two cases of intoxication were the only unwise methods of celebration.

  • A party of soldiers from Biscot were frustrated just in time as they were possessing themselves of the Luton News motor-van.

Lutonian's experiences in the Turkish rout

Extracts from letters sent to his parents at 40 Havelock Road, High Town, by Cpl William Henry Wooding (528195 Royal Engineers) about his experiences in Palestine were reproduced in the Saturday Telegraph of November 9th, 1918. He had been a motorcycle dispatch rider in the East for about three years.

The former Luton Modern School student had met many Luton men during his serving, including, he found after a football match, seven who had played for Luton Town.

Mayoral Day celebrated in Luton

Digest of stories from the Beds & Herts Saturday Telegraph: November 9th, 1918.

Mayoral Day was celebrated in Luton today in an atmosphere of expectation. The possibility of a peace proclamation or the signing of the armistice by Germany attracted even a larger crowd than usual, and the ceremony was performed with due solemnity.

Mayor Impey takes office for fateful year

Mayor Henry Impey

  • Henry Impey and Mayor's Sergeant Frederick Rignall.

Mayoral Day [Saturday, November 9th, 1918] was celebrated in Luton in an atmosphere of expectation. The possibility of a peace proclamation or the signing of the armistice by Germany attracted even a larger crowd than usual, and the ceremony was performed with due solemnity.

DS&S acquires new premises

Digest of stories from The Luton News: Thursday, November 7th, 1918.

DS&S Journal

  • A copy of the DS&S Journal with the new club with its logo over the door on the cover.

The progress of the Luton branch of the National Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Soldiers and Sailors was reported on Saturday evening, when a meeting was held in the newly-acquired Ivy Leaf Club, Park Street. Mr F. Rudd presided.

Influenza epidemic at its peak?

Digest of stories from the Beds & Herts Saturday Telegraph: November 2nd, 1918.

The medical men of Luton have had the busiest week of their lives, and today they are of the opinion that the fiend is at its worst. That is devoutly to be wished, for every street has its quotum of victims and not within living memory has there been such an epidemic in this town and neighbourhood.

Flu closes schools and hits industry

Digest of stories from the Beds & Herts Saturday Telegraph: October 26th, 1918.

The influenza epidemic in Luton continues to spread. Although the town, in comparison with some other places, has been let down fairly lightly so far, unhappily there have been several deaths and, unfortunately, one or two of the doctors have themselves been temporarily incapacitated.

Flu epidemic overwhelms doctors

Digest of stories from The Luton News: Thursday, October 24th, 1918.

Luton is having its fair share of the world-wide influenza epidemic. The doctors, already overwhelmed with work, have been at their wit's end to cope with the unseen enemy. The most they can do it to provide medicine and give general instructions on a wholesale method, for it is found impossible to see all patients individually. One or two of the practitioners are themselves victims.

Appalling hardships at training camp

Digest of stories from the Beds & Herts Saturday Telegraph: October 19th, 1918.

The risk of sending into the services men who are not physically capable of withstanding the transition from comfortable homes to the hardship of camp life is instanced in the sad death of Pte Harold Charles Brightman, whose home is at 25a Langley Street, Luton.

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